Socialism – the Great Deterrent to Native American Indian Progress

Arizona is home to 23 Indian tribes.  If you drive on most of the reservations, you will find a carpet of broken liquor bottles lining the roads. You’ll find unemployment, poorly maintained communities, despair and broken families. The purpose for raising these points is not to belittle Indians, but to point out the root cause of this depressing story – socialism.

The system dominating Indian reservations in Arizona as well as other states is, according to Phoenix Seminary theologian Wayne Grudem, author of “Politics According to the Bible,” a “broken, failed system that traps most Native Americans in perpetual poverty and perpetual alienation from the rest of American society.” That is an apt description of socialism’s end results.

Reservation land is owned by the tribes and managed by the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs. No one is allowed to own land, and no one has responsibility for any land. So there is no incentive for anyone to use the land for economic development.

Grudem writes: “The lack of personal property rights is highly significant, because the study of economic development in world history shows that the key to economic growth among any people in any part of the world is enabling individuals to be able to obtain clearly documented ownership to their own property.”

Private ownership of land encourages land owners to care for, improve and develop their land. That’s how the economy grows and flourishes. It’s how people escape poverty – by gaining employment, developing opportunities and feeding and clothing their families.

“But unless a system of private ownership of property can be instituted, American tribes will simply continue trapping their people in poverty forever,” Grudem wrote.

Native Americans overwhelmingly vote in support of the champions of socialism – the Democratic Party. In the 2012 presidential election, President Barack Obama – advancing the socialist tradition of Democrat presidents Woodrow Wilson, Franklin Roosevelt, Lyndon Johnson and Bill Clinton — won 75 percent of the Native American vote in swing states. Mitt Romney won only Pennsylvania among Indian voters.

Yet what has this blind support gained the 4.3 million Native Americans in America?

  • Generational poverty; 32 percent living below poverty level
  • Unemployment 2.5 times the national rate
  • Alcoholism death rate seven times the national average; an estimated 75 percent of suicides, 80 percent of homicides and 65 percent of motor vehicle deaths among Native Americans involve alcohol
  • 54-percent high school graduation rate
  • 80 percent of fourth-graders unable to read proficiently
  • Higher rates of child abuse and battered women

These are just a few of the tragic consequences of a socialistic system that has never been able to justify itself in America’s – and Arizona’s – pockets of poverty.

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One thought on “Socialism – the Great Deterrent to Native American Indian Progress

  1. Years ago I worked a criminal case on one of the reservations. The defendant was a severe alcoholic – I’ll call her Betty. Her marriage and family had gone to pot and she ended up on the streets with some guy that beat her all the time. Their custom was to be at the local liquor store at 7:30 in the morning when it opened to get the “contract” to sweep the floors and receive their first quart of malt-liquor for free.

    Betty has a crooked nose. She told me it was off to the side of her face because he hit her. She told me it used to be off to the other side for the same reason. She was on crutches. He’d thrown her down and dislocated her hip and it never healed right.

    One day she was in the kitchen cutting up watermelon with a paring knife. He came in with that look in his eyes and she knew what was about to happen. She blindly lashed out with the little paring knife and poked him between the ribs nicking his heart and killing him dead.

    We took the prosecutor to meet Betty and after hearing her story she dropped the charges. On the way back to the office the defense attorney began lamenting that he wished there was more he could do for Betty since she would certainly just return to the streets and continue drinking. I replied that I know exactly what we could do. “What?” he asked, as thought there couldn’t possibly be something he overlooked. “De-fund them,” was my reply. He became incredulous. “She doesn’t get any of the money that goes to the reservations.” That’s not entirely true. She has a place to sleep, she eats, and drinks all she can possibly hold all without paying a cent. But I wasn’t going there. What I explained what that the reservations are dysfunctional. Left to themselves they would disintegrate. Either the people living there would transform themselves or the survivors would move away and the most pathologically broken would die off. But we as the government poor millions of dollars a year into the reservations so that they can keep cranking out people like Betty over and over again, generation after generation.

    While working yet another case I asked two Indians from different generations, one a municipal chief of police for a reservation town and the other the former municipal chief of police, what need to happen to fix the reservations. Without batting an eye they both said that we need to cut off the entitlements and insist on personal responsibility.

    Just recently I read a piece by called “How Socialism Destroyed Africa.” I copied the text and then replaced the words “Africa” with “American Indian Reservations” and “foreign aid” with “Government.” The article reread almost perfectly. It really is sinful that socialism does to people.

    Sadly, Betty died a couple of years later.

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